Education’s great divide: my time in the trenches. “In a dusty corner shelf of the room was a set of thirty-year-old textbooks from the mid-1960s… I spent the rest of the day in slack-jawed amazement, perusing what a student in a working class town was expected to know before the mavens of education began tinkering with the curricula of our schools.” High school of 1960′s = college today. “In a world where knowledge is a commodity we value in the extreme, wisdom, or the possibility of it, is becoming an endangered species.” Progressive!

{ 27 comments… read them below or add one }

whiskeyriver December 14, 2012 at 8:17 am

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I’m a product of the 1960′s school system with one great-grandmother and two grandparents who were real teachers. We learned how to read in English. Spanish could be used on the playground or at home but never in the classroom and we did not need a bi-lingual “teacher” to learn either.

If we did something wrong in class out came the paddle. Since I come from a small town in northern New Mexico the teachers knew most of the parents so Mom found out what you did in class. This usually resulted in another ass whipping when you got home. Needless to say we were fairly well behaved kids when in school.

When I realized what was going on when my children were in school it was almost too late. Most of what they really learned they learned at home from us, the parents, and my retired teacher grandparents. Now I have grandchildren but they do not go to a pubic skrewel. I gladly help the kids with the cost so my grandchildren can attend a private school where education and disipline are the number one priorities.

Fenster314 December 14, 2012 at 9:39 am

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“If we did something wrong in class out came the paddle.”

When I graduated HS, ,many in the top 10% of the class wanted to go into teaching. I followed up with several academically accomplished friends after they got their teaching credentials and they unanimously stated that they were no long considering a teaching career since they couldn’t take the lack of discipline in the classrooms since corporal punishment had been banned. The common phrase was “I didn’t go into teaching to become a baby sitter.”

I should note that in these schools, corporal punishment was always a “last resort” and was pretty rare in my experience. But the threat was always there and that’s what kept the kids in line.

whiskeyriver December 15, 2012 at 8:13 am

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“I should note that in these schools, corporal punishment was always a “last resort” and was pretty rare in my experience. But the threat was always there and that’s what kept the kids in line.”

My claim to fame in my freshman year was I got to sign the paddle of every teacher I had, and the principles too.

RKae December 14, 2012 at 10:55 am

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I went to a private Christian school in 1970. There was one time when I had to stand in front of the class and get smacked with a ruler across my palms. One time. That’s all it took.

I’m all for it.

perlcat December 14, 2012 at 10:38 pm

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That’s my plan for my grandkids. I already told my kids that. My younger son is on-board — hoping the other one figures it out by the time he starts his family.

whiskeyriver December 15, 2012 at 8:16 am

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If there is any way financially you can, do it as soon as you can. My oldest grandson was in the 7th grade when he started in the private school he attends and that first year was tough for him. He was so far behind, had so much catching up to do, that going on to the 8th grade looked iffy for a while.

Big Al December 14, 2012 at 8:29 am

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It is not an education it is an indoctrination. I have a nephew who scored in the bottom 15% twice on the SAT’s and Penn State accepted him last year. He is doing well there, so what does that tell you?

whiskeyriver December 14, 2012 at 8:55 am

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That Penn State’s qualifications for admission is in the crapper?

Big Al December 14, 2012 at 8:58 am

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Some will draw that conclusion.

flashingscotsman December 14, 2012 at 9:28 am

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And that they don’t expect much once you get there?

Big Al December 14, 2012 at 12:05 pm

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That is my fear.

perlcat December 14, 2012 at 10:37 pm

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Well, they expect his money.

ThatOtherGuy December 14, 2012 at 9:33 am

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Uhm, private education? I was talking to a high school teacher and when I told her what private school my kids went to she said “I can always tell those kids on sight. They look you in the eye when they talk to you and they are a year ahead of everyone else.” And she meant a year ahead of other private schools.

I think the $250,000 ‘rich’ designation from the left is very telling. Its about the income you need to give a family of four kids a proper education (private) with out any kind of discount, live in a safe neighborhood in a nice house, drive a car big enough to survive a hit with a traffic cone, and put away enough for retirement so that you don’t rely on your kids.

What is ‘rich’ now is what we took for granted as a solid middle class life a generation or two ago.

This lifestyle inflation, or really the destruction of the American dream by the simultaneous dilution and disparaging of what makes America great along with the inflation that robs us of our savings is all designed to make us more reliant on the govt.

We should have all been warned when they called it QE1; just how many did they have planned?

Fenster314 December 14, 2012 at 9:46 am

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“…. just how many did they have planned?”

Check the national debt and how all the money in the world couldn’t pay it off. When inflation brings that figure down to under a fraction of the GDP then they’ll stop. My guess is a purposeful 5 to 10x inflation is in progress at the moment.

flashingscotsman December 14, 2012 at 10:31 pm

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As many as it takes to destroy the economy.

CO2Insanity December 14, 2012 at 9:42 am

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If public schools are so great tell me why I had both of my sons come home crying about learning long division (of all things)? Why? Because their teachers were incapable of explaining long division (if you can believe that one). After about 10 minutes I had both of them turned into long division champs and the tears turned into smiles. Both times the teacher got a nasty note from me sent in a sealed envelope and both times I received no response.

I had another one send an algebra problem home with my eldest son years later when he was in Jr. High. He was about in tears trying to solve this one problem. I grabbed it and soon found out the problem wasn’t solvable because the textbook was wrong. I even emailed it to a friend who came to the same conclusion as me. The teacher was clueless (this wasn’t a newly published textbook either).

I sent him a nasty note, too, questioning his teaching ability and wondering who the moron is that approves textbooks. Again no reply.

flashingscotsman December 14, 2012 at 10:41 pm

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They don’t have to answer your questions. Just ask a union leader/goon.

ooddballz December 14, 2012 at 9:57 am

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Thankfully, I was never one to allow school interfere with my education.

flashingscotsman December 14, 2012 at 10:43 pm

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I was working closely with a Licensed Resident Engineer on an airport project, and he inspired me to go after a degree in Civil Engineering. We talked about it, and he encouraged me, but also warned me that schoolin’ was fine, but not to let it get in the way of my education. I took that very seriously.

whiskeyriver December 15, 2012 at 8:27 am

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I built highways, bridges and dams for over 32 years and can’t tell you how many “engineers” I had to put up with who let their “schoolin’” get in the way of their education.

The truly sad thing is most of them worked for the gooberment as designers or inspectors and they had no clue. My education came from UHK, working with people who knew how to get things done, and I was much better off because of it.

flashingscotsman December 15, 2012 at 12:12 pm

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Nothing teaches like getting your hands dirty.

Elrond Hubbard December 14, 2012 at 10:51 am

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My oldest son was a teacher at a Milwaukee public school for five years before fleeing to the suburbs. He taught mainly 9th and 10th graders, “taught” being a piece of fiction since he spent most of his time just trying to establish some semblance of order in chaotic classrooms. Teaching anything was a struggle, the students learned little, many didn’t want to learn anything, they’d get up and walk out of the classroom, they’d fight in the hallways, they’d fall asleep at their desks, on any given day 25% wouldn’t even show up, some of those who did show up were obviously high. There were always a policeman/men on duty at the school.

Most came from single parent homes, some came from no parent homes—they were living with grandma or an aunt or some distant relative, their home lives were as chaotic as their school lives.

It’s a lost generation, they’ll never be functionally literate or acquire job skills, they face a lifetime of government dependentcy and they’ll always vote Democrat.

PsychoDad December 14, 2012 at 12:12 pm

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“they’ll never be functionally literate or acquire job skills, they face a lifetime of government dependentcy and they’ll always vote Democrat.”

But it’s just right wing paranoid Teebag H8ers who suspect that might be something other than accidental, right?

jcrowley1985 December 14, 2012 at 12:52 pm

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Just as Corporate Greed wants it; them to be brainwashed and easily controlled.

Elrond Hubbard December 14, 2012 at 2:43 pm

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Your comment is so mind numbingly stupid and so ignorant of facts that no meaningful reply is possible.

Not so silent December 14, 2012 at 2:57 pm

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Creepy Crowley is a proud product of our epic fail school system. Perfect for this thread, we see daily just how ignorant and unable to grasp reality this knucklehead is….Crowley was probably the valedictorian at his reform/high school. And got a letter in the audio/visual club.

Progressive Hemrrhoid December 14, 2012 at 2:19 pm

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The union scum that attempts to pass themselves off as Public School teachers have become babysitters and propagandists for the most part. They know that most parents are too busy trying to pay the bills, or too lazy to pay attention to the sub-standard curriculum that is being used these days.
When LGBT studies are more important then Math or English, you know these people suck at their jobs.