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CEO of Patagonia pledges all company’s resources to fighting Donald Trump. That’s all well and good, you dumb bitch, but what happens when millions of Republicans pledge all their resources to never buying another stitch of clothing at Patagonia?

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19 Comments on "CEO of Patagonia pledges all company resources to fighting Trump"

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KimmyQueen
Member

Patagonia won’t ever see my money

MGAP
Member

I’m going to have to research a little deeper here. Basically she’s fighting Trump because he is returning some of the land obama turned into national monuments. It depends a lot on which piece of land, on a case by case basis to me. We need to preserve a lot of our lands and making them national monuments does that pretty quickly and without a fight in Congress. Some of the monument ‘grabs’ obama made were outrageous, while I agree with some of the others.
However, she needs to be careful where she treads. Patagonia is higher end gear and a lot of their customers are not liberal twads that can’t afford their own place to live, but more affluent consumers that tend to vote more conservatively.

JPTravis
Member

No. No, no, and no. There is already far too much land in federal possession and I can cite you studies that show the WORST maintained and WORST handled land in America is ALWAYS the land owned by the federal government. Shit, most of the state of Nevada is federally owned and it’s not supposed to be–the federal government welshed on its agreement to return the land to the state. But meanwhile all that land in Nevada looks like shit and Vegas is trying to rape the whole place for water, which I’m pretty sure the feds are going to allow to happen. Other states with vast, poorly-maintained land in federal hands: Alaska (almost all federally owned), Michigan, I could go on and on. The feds don’t DO anything constructive with all that land. They don’t even make any noticeable attempt to preserve it. Here in Michigan, the absolute last place you want to visit is a national forest, because they’re shitholes of neglect, with just enough sign of man-made scarring to keep you from thinking you’re in virgin forest. Meanwhile, the state forests at least show signs that someone rational is in charge and gives a shit.

MGAP
Member

Thought this was about the national monuments obama created, not BLM or national forest land. Big difference in the way it’s managed. Of course all of these agencies are so underfunded, they can barely keep the lights on as it is.

MGAP
Member

Oops, I see BLM and NFS, CAN manage NMs. That I didn’t know. But i still stand by my original statement that it depends on a case by case basis. I feel the NPS would be more effective at managing something, keeping it in it’s wilderness state, than BLM or the NFS can.

JPTravis
Member

The NPS is so understaffed they have twenty-mile waiting lines at the entrance to Yellowstone Park, can’t seem to empty their trash barrels, and if you try to ask someone a question they act like you just farted in the elevator. And notice I haven’t yet mentioned the way they joined the political argument the last time the government shut down. Okay, I guess I just mentioned it. None of these federal bureaucracies are good at what they do. There’s one national park or monument down on the border that illegals use as a superhighway to enter the U.S. The bureaucrats won’t let the immigration people in because they say they’re protecting the pristine natural conditions, but don’t seem to care about the thousands of illegals throwing trash and defecating all over the place on their way through.

MGAP
Member

I hear you and agree on the superhighway thing. Assuming you are talking about Organ mountains?

I have to call you out on the NPS people though. The line to get into Yellowstone is long. Because the road in is two lane, the infrastructure is outdated and not capable of handling the volume of visitors. It’s been like that for a long time too. Couple that with stupid people that wait in line for two hours, pull up to the window and only then start looking for their money to get in. Then proceed to ask the ranger 20 or 30 stupid questions like where’s the nearest Starbucks or whats the wifi password in the park or why is my phone service spotty. However, I do agree that Yellowstone is without doubt, the most poorly managed NP I’ve visited. It’s huge, the road system is not large enough to handle traffic, no parking and it does need a good trash pick up. I’ve been there once as an adult and we decided we did not ever need to go back and haven’t.

We use the NPS extensively and I must say Yellowstone is not representative of the other parks in the system. The valley at Yosemite comes close, but we avoid that area and focus on getting into the High Sierra back country off Tioga road. I’ve yet to come across someone who doesn’t care or seems to wish they were elsewhere. These are some of the most dedicated professionals in any job I’ve ever come across in my time on this planet. They’ll answer any stupid question thrown at them with a smile and professional courtesy; I’ve overheard visitors asking if it is ok to pet the bears in Yosemite, twice! And they do this for pretty meager wages and spartan living conditions.

My wife and I have discussed becoming volunteers in the park system when I retire. Hopefully health will allow us to do just that and repay some of the awesome memories my family has made in the parks.

JPTravis
Member

You sound like you use national parks a lot whereas I avoid them like the plague, not just because of the federal bureaucracy running them but because of the stupid people who tend to frequent them. My parents and I watched aghast in Yellowstone as idiot tourists with cameras waved their families closer to the “cute moose herd” so they could get a better picture… while an angry male moose was pawing the ground, getting more and more riled up, and trying to decide who to kill first. That was after waiting hours to get into the place. And what’s the waiting list for a donkey ride into the Grand Canyon? Something like five years? Ridiculous. Either don’t do it at all or raise the price until you have something close to market demand. Every good experience I have ever had was in a state park or forest, not a national one… oh wait, I did take my little girls hiking along Picture Rocks National Lakeshore… that was pretty cool, although we all stunk so bad after a week in the woods I almost decided to burn our clothes.

MGAP
Member

We had the best experience one year at GC. The wife called last minute and there was opening at Phantom Ranch. Thanksgiving Day and because the weather was horrible. It was a fluke that we just happened to call and got the cabin. we opted to hike in and I chose to hike out, where my wife and the girls wanted to ride the mules up. Luckily they were able to get the mule ride too! We stepped off the rim in a blinding snowstorm and 20 degrees. The wind was so bad, we were holding on to the kids to keep them from blowing off the ridgeline! It was so windy that we almost aborted. I kept thinking I was going to be ‘that dumbass’ on the nightly news that got the whole family killed at the GC hiking in a blizzard. Luckily once we got deep enough in the canyon and the wind was blocked, the sun came out. What a beautiful hike. Still in the 20s, but clear and sunny. We spent the night and I left early, thinking they girls would eventually catch and pass me on the mules. They didn’t. I saw one lady meditating on a rock about 300 yards from the ranch. After that, I had the entire canyon to myself. It was about 28 degrees, clear and sunny. I hiked out of the canyon and didn’t see another soul until I hit the switchbacks near the rim and that was just one guy. He’d had the same blissful experience I had hiking a mile or so ahead of me the whole time. Top ten lifetime experience for me.

JPTravis
Member

I want to go to that place they always show in movies. It’s in the canyon system somewhere but I think it’s Indian land. It’s got a beautiful pool you can swim in at the bottom of a beautiful waterfall. Closest I’ve ever come to that was Tallulah Gorge where we took the “strenuous” hike and discovered it was actually much more strenuous than we expected but halfway through we came to a beautiful little pool formed by the river. Perfect for swimming on a hot day. Trouble is, the pool had slanting rocks around it and they were so smooth and slippery you couldn’t get out of the damn water without the handy rope the state of South Caroline leaves dangling there for exactly that purpose. Well, naturally, as soon as I went in swimming my soon-to-be-son-in-law pulled up the rope and then everybody sat there laughing their asses off as I tried to get out. Bastard. And he’d driven all the way to Atlanta to ask my permission to marry my daughter. I should have said no.

MGAP
Member

Sounds like Havasu Falls. We had that trip planned and set to go last year. Something came up and we ended not being able to go. It’s pretty remote and difficult to get to. Even planning the trip was pretty difficult my wife, the trip planner, was pissed when we didn’t go.

JPTravis
Member

It’s in the Nicholas Cage movie Next. I want to kick all the Indians out and live there myself. Which I suspect is neither agreeable to the Indians nor politically correct thinking.

poppajoe49
Member

I’ll stick with state parks as well, especially because I get in free because I’m a disabled veteran.

CO2Insanity
Admin

I have a couple of their jackets. I will not be buying anymore of their stuff. Screw them.

JPTravis
Member

When I read about them at Wikipedia I discovered the company has a rather sleazy history, even before the leftwing political crap. The founder started out making climbing gear before getting into the clothing business, but his climbing gear was faulty and the company was sued into bankruptcy after climbers died when their gear failed. Fortunately for him, the clothing part of the company was separate and survived. Then, a while back they were discovered to be using child and slave labor to manufacture their clothing. So basically, maybe this CEO should look in the mirror if she’s looking for a moral cause to pursue, instead of going after Trump.

KimmyQueen
Member

Typical liberal hypocrite

deepthinker
Member

Hope this company is not a public traded one, if it is, she may have to back off her pledge. Just like all the other dip shits who pledge to move out of the US if Trump became President. Well dip shits he became President Donald Trump and all of you are still here.

JPTravis
Member

I Googled the company to see if it was publicly traded. Looks like the answer is no although I only looked at Wikipedia. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t shareholders who are gonna be pissed when half the country stops spending money there.

I can’t believe how stupid these CEOs are. Yet somehow they never get fired for hurting their companies with ill-conceived leftwing political bullshit.

poppajoe49
Member

No, they’re not publicly traded, I looked them up on my trading app. She’s not only stupid, she’s damned lucky.