Environmentalists baffled: Gulf Coast wildlife is thriving after oil spill

by editor on July 28, 2011

Hmmmmm. Remember all those news stories that said the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was the greatest environmental disaster in history? You know, the ones that said the oil would devastate Gulf Coast wildlife for decades, that avian life would be decimated, that the Gulf Coast was a dead zone.

In the words of Saturday Night Live’s Emily Litella, “Never mind.” Turns out the Gulf Coast has never had so damn many birds.

laughing-gull-gulf-coast

Now we know what the laughing gull is laughing at: The environmentalists' predictions

Reuters has the avian info:

The 1,300-acre, man-made island is hosting more than 50,000 birds this summer as nesting pairs gather to raise babies. That number would be considered high in any year, but it’s a particularly surprising sight a year after oil from the BP spill fouled surrounding waters.

The Deepwater Horizon rig explosion spewed more than 168 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over three months, the largest spill in U.S. history. But so far, there is no evidence of deformities or ill health among the young on Gaillard Island.

Scientists speculate that the baby boom probably results from an abundance of fish left undisturbed in waterways where the federal government banned commercial and recreational fishing last summer, providing a feast for shore birds.

Abundance of fish? But we thought the Gulf Coast waters were a dead zone in which nothing could live. But…but… but…

In a speech this spring, the executive director of the nearby Dauphin Island Sea Lab said the fish populations in that part of the Gulf were larger than he had ever seen.

The population of the pelicans, terns, laughing gulls, egrets, ibis and little blue and tricolored herons nesting on Gaillard Island is determined by the food supply, said Roger Clay, a wildlife biologist with the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries.

Now hold on just a darn second. We thought the few fish that didn’t die in the oil were horribly sickened by it, had given birth to deformed little fish fingers and that they would all end up devastating animals further up the food chain.

“If something was wrong with the food, the first place it would show is with the birds,” said Clay, also known as the “the pelican guy.”

In other words, if something were wrong with the science and the scientists, this is also the first place it would show up.

But let’s not talk about that. Hey, look over there. It’s a bright, shiny object.

Source: Reuters

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38 Comments on "Environmentalists baffled: Gulf Coast wildlife is thriving after oil spill"

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[…] Remember when all the sealife in the Gulf was going to die because of the oil spill? Nevermind. […]

KimmyQueen
Guest

LOL Gaia Worshippers = FAIL

KimmyQueen
Guest

Ha, ha I made a gaia worshipper mad! You still fail!

Lee H
Guest

While I do take the Federal Government saying something is safe with a huge grain of salt, I also use that same grain of salt in comparison when they say something is bad for me. Remember, there was a time when the Government said that radiation was good for you. That is why the Funding for the EPA along with other Power Hungry Bureaucratic Commissions needs to disappear. When they lie, regardless of their intent, it instills distrust of anything they say. When I was a child, Mosquito Abatement sprayed DDT through the neighborhoods from pick ups. We used to run behind the truck in the fog, and we did this quite often. While no one I grew up with had any side affects from this, I can accept the fact that after its use was stopped, the bird population has increased, though I am not sure if this was the only cause and effect.

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[…] Environmentalists baffled: Gulf Coast wildlife is thriving after oil spill    Link: https://www.ihatethemedia.com/environmentalists-baffled-gulf-coast-wildlife-is-thriving-after-oil-spi… […]

PsychoDad
Guest

I’ll stick up for Sidekick to the extent that having a concern about this particular kind of chemical is a legitimate concern, especially as it impinges directly on food we eat. As long as we don’t run in circles screaming like leftards in a tantrum panic over it, OK? Let’s see what the science says -the real science, not the “consensus” science – and make rational decisions based on risk/benefit analysis. If using it means that everything will end up OK, but we can’t eat Gulf shrimp for 5 years — I’m OK with that. Especially if it means that otherwise, we can’t eat anything out of there ever again.

I’m a rock-bound New England Yankee, but I do LOVE Gulf shrimp!

MGAP
Member

This is another example of man having no control of mother nature. Oil has been bubbling out of the Gulf o’ Mexico for eons. Tarballs were washing up on the beach before the first rig was ever fired up. Tarballs will be washing ashore after man is gone from the face of this planet.
We need to do everthing possible to prevent intentional polluting of these areas and for the most part I feel that we are. I flew over the spill on a flight to Cozumel and the plume of oil seemed to go on forever. I too thought the Gulf region was totally fked for at least the next 5 years. I’m glad to see i was wrong. Never underestimate the power of a constant tidal flow. Toss in a few tropical storms and nature can effectively flush the toilet on it’s own.

FormerlyDeanH
Guest

Globaloney takes a shot to the temple in this little far right wing extremist article; http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-data-blow-gaping-hold-global-warming-alarmism-192334971.html

sifi
Member

It’s about time the truth came out. Thanks for the link. Hope to see more articles like this one.

jukin
Guest

The bottom line is that regressives never get tired of being wrong.

AZ Dude
Member

Yeah–they just want to be judged on their motives, not their results. “I was just looking out for the [fill in your favorite pet cause here].” Phhhhhtt!

Ten
Guest

Don’t you love it when the Greenies are solidly proven to be alarmist ignoramuses? It seems to happen so often now.

So …. how about turning on the water in California?

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Not with Brown as Governor, and the Legislature full of Dems. Even if the Feds backed out of the situation, I’m sure our local boys will step in to make sure no food is grown in the Central Valley.

Joe Redfield
Guest

I remember that the Alaskan pipeline was going to wipe out the caribou, at least according to the greenies, but instead the caribou population more than doubled within a few years of the completion of the pipeline. I long for the day when environmentalists will make the endangered species list.

poppajoe49
Member

I prefer Maine lobster and Ipswich clams, so Gulf seafood isn’t much of a concern for me. However, I need to look into the corexit more, I really don’t know enough to comment on it.

perlcat
Member

I figure that it is one more thing that is overblown. Our sensationalist media still cannot comprehend one thing about the environment — “The dose makes the poison”. A few PPB of a dispersant is highly unlikely to be a factor, no matter how toxic in a high concentration. It would have to be a monstrously catalytic reaction to make such a low concentration have an effect.

There’s worse stuff than that in the drinking water in far higher concentrations — lead, mercury, arsenic, for example. When things get concentrated, I suppose it could be a problem — for example, mercury accumulating in the livers of fish (so don’t eat fish liver from the Great Lakes if you’re pregnant — that, or name your daughter Olivia, and let her post in bulletin boards on the internet, baring her biases, neuroses, anger, and ignorance for all the world to see — sort of a Liberal lap dunce of all that is ‘vile’).

hisham
Guest

HAHA! *snork* Isn’t that the truth!

hisham
Guest

Oh Sidekick, you worry too much about stuff you can’t do anything about…youre gonna die of something toxic, it’s called DEATH and you probably won’t have a whole lot of control over that either. So, if you stop eating seafood from the Gulf, what about the shit we get from China? They have no environmental protection program and the shit they send us is toxic and we eat it. Why be worried about one food environment and not another one that’s ten times worse? We need to get rid of the EPA, if for no other reason than to stop them from turning every hotdog dropped on the sidewalk into an environmental disaster zone and a candidate for superfund funding!

Sidekick
Member

I’ll die of something but I do have control over whether or not I eat corexit. Sorry guys, I don’t buy for a minute that the Gulf is “clean”. Did you know that you need a federal permit to do any testing of the sand and water in the affected areas? So, who are those environmentalists? I live on the Gulf and I watched seafood restaurant owners on the water receive checks from BP to stay quiet.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/22/gulf-oil-spill-blood_n_812398.html

http://www.wkrg.com/gulf_oil_spill/article/federal-practices-hamper-study-of-gulf-dolphin-deaths/1206250/Apr-16-2011_6-59-pm/

Be my guest, Hisham, eat all the Gulf shrimp you want.

hisham
Guest

No, no, that’s quite alright, I’ll eat my shrimp from the Atlantic coast, from down around Savanna, GA, or Florida’s Atlantic coast somewhere. How long does this corexit stuff stay in the ecosystem and general marine environment? Do you think Gulf restaurant businesses will return, and how much of this can we blame on Obama and his cronies and George Soros and his cronies?

RockingHorseGuy
Member

“how much of this can we blame on Obama and his cronies and George Soros and his cronies?”

I go with 100%.

Sidekick
Member

I can’t find a link that answers your first question but this link goes into more detail about what corexit is.

http://www.tuberose.com/Corexit.html

The Gulf restaurants in Pinellas County seem to be thriving. We go to the beach frequently and the restaurants are full. To make a movie reference: Obama and Soros are like the mayor in “Jaws” in that they will tell you everything is fine and the water is great right up until people start getting sick or the blue crab population dies out.

farmdude
Guest

You did notice the source on the first link??… Huffington Post?.. Please.

Sidekick
Member

I’m not surprised that you guys are skeptical and that is fine but, Farmdude, the HuffPo link is sourced and now you sound like Olivia disbelieving something because you don’t like the source. I just think it is amazing that when the Obama regime says something that you disagree with you rightly say BS but when it is what you want to hear you are total believers. I’ve been contributing to this site long enough to demonstrate that I am a conservative but I am also a Floridian who travels all over the state for work and if you think that the Gulf is clean so be it. I believe that there is a lot of corexit in the food chain and in the aquifers. I have friends who live on the Panhandle and they have told me about the police and park service running off the university (UF and FSU) scientists who want to run their own samples without a federal permit. My neighbor is an environmental geologist who worked in the affected areas and he personally witnessed fisherman who were paid by BP via the federal government to gather up all of the dead fish, dolphins and even whales and grind them up before they could wash ashore for the media to photograph.

That said, business is returning to normal in the Destin area (where I do business frequently) and I hope I am wrong but to pronounce everything fine when the government is determining who is telling you everything is fine may be the wrong conclusion.

This is for Farmdude:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAjRje2rhQk
http://www.newser.com/story/96839/oil-dispersant-enters-gulf-food-chain.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr9ueOIpjho

Lastly, the gusher was a one off that will not likely happen again and I wish we were drilling our asses off in the Gulf and everywhere else where proven reserves exist. By no means does my opinion about the Gulf influence that

farmdude
Guest

Let’s get one thing clear,… the only time I believe B O is when he says he’s leaving on vacation. Thank God it’s often.
Most of the reason I’m skeptical of many environmental articles, especially one that would be quoted by the Huff Po, is that they almost always turn out to be phony information that’s simply an effort to promote their agenda (duh!). There are some environmental issues that need to be taken seriously, but the avalance of deception thrown at us by these people makes causes that are credible to be ignored. And anything the Huff Po writes or quotes needs to be eyed with suspicion at best. I’m sure they’ve printed some things that have proven to be true in the past, probably by accident.

whiskeyriver
Guest

Sorry SK but I gotta disagree with you. Anyone that thinks the Gulf waters were “clean” before the BP spill is delusional. For hundreds of years ships have dumped all their crap and garbage into the water. Until environmental regulations stopped them thousands of garbage scows, from Brownsville to the Florida Keys hauled the trash from all the cities and towns along the Gulf and dumped it into the water.

How long have oil companies been operating in the Gulf? Who knows what the people working on these rigs have dumped over the side of the rigs offshore all those years. What about all the commercial, and personal, fishing boats around the Gulf? Does anyone know what crud they have dumped over the side in the last 100 years? The waters of the Gulf have not been really clean since the minutemen took New Orleans away from the French.

If you could figure out how to send a couple dozen fresh oysters and 10 pounds of Gulf shrimp to New Mexico I would be glad to pay for it. When I was visiting family in Houston this past March I stuffed myself with as many as I could get and I ain’t dead yet!

Sidekick
Member

I hear you, whiskey. Like I said before. I hope I am 100% wrong. The Gulf area is home BTW, my sister and her family live in ABQ. Great area!

selsey.steve
Guest

I wonder if you have ever tried to research just what the Chinese put into their foodstuffs? I lived in Hong Kong for 30 years and saw many bans placed on foodstuffs sourced from China on health grounds, including chickens which had so much in the way of injected hormones in them that they were bringing 7 and 8 year-old girls to early puberty!
Corexit is nothing in comparison.

Sidekick
Member

I here we do the same thing with our cattle and now milk and meat are full of hormones. I’m with you that there are big problems with our food supply. Eating shrimp and other seafood from the affected area is avoidable until we learn more from independent sources. Sadly, we have little control over much of the other things we eat.

perlcat
Member

No, there are a *lot* of regulations about that.

They test for the presence of antibiotics and growth hormones in milk, for example. As opposed to the chinese, who *don’t* test for melamine — they just feed it to the citizens.

That is the problem you get when you combine moral relativism with socialism. Then the people are just numbers to be exploited.

Sidekick
Member

http://www.premiumbeef.com/page/1006/benefits.html?inet=aD1vcmFyc3ZnZi15YXgmcmg9dWJ6ci15YXgmcnBsdWdpbi1hY3Rpb249ZGVmYXVsdA

Who knows? Like Hisham said, I’m going to die from something. Might as well be a New York strip and a bottle of Cakebread

gad-fly
Guest

The Huffpo Green post about workers testing positive for benzene is not very surprising since natural oil seepage into the Gulf can be as high 3,835 barrels per day — everyday.

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/6552

As for dolphins and whales, some 92,000 live in the gulf – that is a death rate of about 0.1%.

http://www.gomr.boemre.gov/homepg/regulate/environ/marmam/Cetacean.pdf

Sidekick
Member

I still am concerned about corexit, the dispersant agent used. That stuff is very toxic and likely got into the food chain. I still am leery of eating Gulf seafood. Maybe I am wrong and I hope that I am.

MGAP
Member

I actually had an in depth conversation at dinner with a park ranger in Yosemite about chemical dispersants last year. He was so far left that water bottles were a hot button for him ( yes, i pushed that button). He got on the soapbox and told us with 100% certainty that the dispersants used would destroy the planet. After hearing such blind faith with little to back it up, I felt significantly better about the use of these chemicals! My thinking was if a card carrying member of the Sierra Club was preaching it, it probably wasn’t as bad as he wanted it to be. Later the guy sang us a song around the campfire. I’ll paraphrase the lyrics, “oil baaad, trees gooood. Cars baaaad, water good. This cat even had a guitar, up in Sierra high country, Ranger Mike. True story I swear to God.

perlcat
Member

I’d have gotten after him for using a guitar — after all, they use *CHEMICALS* to finish them, and some of them will be around for MILLIONS of years!!eleventy.
I’d tell him that the only acceptable instrument is clapping his hands, or he is a filthy tool of the industrialists.

Then comes the mocking.

MGAP
Member

Bless your heart, but that’s faulty logic. He uses the guitar to spread the message, think aural Kool-aid! So it’s OK to have, just like Al G’s jet is needed to get him around as quickly as possible to spread the message and save the planet in a more timely manner. Necessary evils and such… ;P

RockingHorseGuy
Member

And this tool worked directly for who? Oh, that’s right, the Federal Government. So we’re paying his wages.

Homersdad
Member

Now I understand what Homer (My basset hound) was trying to tell me that day I took him for a walk on the beach. He came upon a tar ball and got a puzzled look on his face. He sniffed it, then sniffed his butt, then looked at me and wagged his tail as if to say “No harm, no foul”. The boy is a prophet.