How many Congressmen does it take to screw up a lightbulb?

by editor on August 3, 2011

Q: How many congresspersons does it take to change a light bulb?
A: As many as crony capitalist CFL bulb manufacturers can to afford to buy off!

According to Jeff Jacoby, the incandescent ban, passed in the Democrat-controlled Congress in 2007 but not vetoed by President Bush, has less to do with saving the planet or keeping Al Gore’s mansion from floating away and more to do with bulb-makers’ profits:

good-idea-lightbulb

"Hey, here's an idea. Let's rip off the American people."

On paper, [the law’s] purpose is to increase energy efficiency by requiring that bulbs produce more light per watt. But by setting the new standards higher than the common incandescent can reach, the law’s real-world effect is to deprive most Americans of the freedom to buy the light bulbs they prefer. Instead, they will be forced to spend more money for fragile halogen bulbs or for the swirled compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that have been around for decades but that most consumers have never wanted to buy. 

The use of efficiency mandates to snuff out the standard light bulb was an exercise of unadulterated crony capitalism. It came about after big bulb manufacturers, frustrated by their customers’ refusal to switch from cheap throwaway incandescents to the far more profitable compact fluorescents touted by greens, decided to play hardball.

Build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to your door, especially if you contribute generously to enough greedy scumbag politicians who’ll mandate it.

By the way, the Germans circumvented their weasel-fuhrers’ ban on incandescents by selling them as “heat bulbs.” Don’t know about you, but we’re starting to feel a bit chilly ourselves.

– Written by Bonfire of the Absurdities

Source: Boston.com

Leave a Reply

35 Comments on "How many Congressmen does it take to screw up a lightbulb?"

Notify of
JPTravis
Member

Great minds think alike: http://jpattitude.com/110722.php

RockingHorseGuy
Member

That’s a great link, J.P. Funny how they photoshopped that lightbulb into a picture of Barney Frank talking about last night’s date.

JPTravis
Member

LOL. I do my own photoshopping. I know it’s pretty amateurish at times, but you should see me sitting there, drinking honey-flavored whiskey and laughing at my own cleverness while I create my images.

At least I’m enjoying myself.

PsychoDad
Guest

Yup, time to start stocking up. Half the cellar for real light bulbs, the other half for ammo.

poppajoe49
Member

Where will you put the freeze dried food?

rightinwa
Member

I see this game repeating itself in a few years after a few dozen billion CFLs are sold and the light bulb people recoup their “investment” in Congress. Then, they will go back to Congress and lobby (bribe) to get the “dangerous” CFLs banned and force everyone on to LEDs.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

And guess who will be stuck with the bill for getting rid of all the Hazardous Waste?

Buck O'Fama
Guest

Liberal politicians are the most hazardous of wastes.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Yeah, and look how difficult they are to get rid of.

hisham
Guest

I hope the build a better mousetrap claptrap crowd in the CFL industry chokes on their cheese.

MGAP
Member

They were trying to give these things away at my grocery store last. They had a basket of them with a coupon making them free. The checker scanned it and went to put it in my bag. I told her I did not want it. Again, “Sir, it’s free!” I should have taken it, dropped it and called 911 to get in a Hazmat crew to handle the mercury spill, shut the whole f****g place down to clean up the “free” stuff….

FormerlyDeanH
Guest

You might have been detained for the purpose of evaluating your evil terrorist ways, reckless and wanton endangering of innocents nearby. The checker was operating in a capacity similar to a heroin or crack dealer, giving out the first sample free just to hook you for life!

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Yes, the LED’s are a much higher quality light than the CFLs. Any photographer that has played around with different lighting for his after-dark shoots will tell you that LED brings out colors and detail better than any flourescent lights.

FormerlyDeanH
Guest

Not all LEDs are created equal. The spectrum and output varies significantly. In a hurry to cash in many manufacturers have produced less than quality items.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

I’ve already installed some inexpensive ones, and I like them a lot.

bgirardo
Member

I’m glad you had the CHOICE to switch! 😉

danybhoy
Member

The future of lightbulbs is LEDs, not CFLs, & it’s only a matter of time until they come down in price enough to start selling in large numbers.

Winghunter
Member

I won’t buy those CFL’s. Period.

I replaced all the bulbs in my house with the new LEDs. They give off much more and a better light than the older ones and equaling incandescent brightness. Yeah, they cost a mint up front BUT, do the math and you’ll also figure out they save you money in the long run by both electricity rates and not having to replace them for 25 to 30 years. Have an electrician at Home Depot show them and explain it to you. Buy a few at a time instead of replacing them all at once.

As far as Congressmen go, make sure your entire family votes in the next election. We replaced 15% of them last time and we’ll replace 30% in ’12. Take back our country!

JPTravis
Member

If you think any lightbulb is going to last 25 to 30 years, I have a bridge I want to sell you in Brooklyn. Hate to tell you, but you fell for the government’s misinformation scam.

Plus, think what this does the lower income saps who can’t afford thrity dollar lightbulbs.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Let’s just say that LED bulbs last an extraordinarily long time. And the lower income saps can just get the Dems to start. a program whereby the taxpayer pays for it.

poppajoe49
Member

The LEDs have one major advantage over CFLs. They generate much less heat. Have you ever tried to touch the ballast (white ceramic base) of a CFL bulb? They run almost as hot as an incandescent. That heat is from electrical consumption. The LEDs use much less electricity to generate light than any other of the currently used lighting systems, that is why they run so much cooler. The lower heat generation is also responsible for the longer life of the LEDs. Less heat generated results in a slower breakdown of the materials in the light, which results in longer life.
There hasn’t been enough research on the newer LED bulbs yet, but it wouldn’t surprise me if they did last at least 20 years, making the ROI still very advantageous. Plus, as danybhoy mentioned, as they become more mainstream, the prices will drop quite a bit.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Ok, so here’s my question about the high cost of LED bulbs. I can go to Home Depot right now, and buy TWO small aluminum LED flashlights, complete with batteries, for $5. They actually put out a decent amount of light. How come it costs so much to produce a light bulb of say, twenty times the power of one of those flashlights?

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Just out of curiosity, I looked up RV interior lighting bulbs, (we’re full-time RVer’s), and I can get them for $9 on E-bay. Sounds like a deal.

Angry Southerner
Member

I am an industrial maintenance technician and the reasons why a led flashlight is so cheap compared to a lightbulb is as follows:
1) poppajoe is right you are going from 3 volts to 120 volts and that requires special circuitry.
2) a flashlight works off of batteries which is DC voltage a lightbulb is running off you home electricity which is AC, Alternating Current, and that also requires even more circuitry.
what this means is that it costs more money to make a LED lightbulb than an incandescent bulb= higher price

poppajoe49
Member

Because you’re making low voltage DC lights work on 120 volts. There is circuitry that has to be built in that will keep them from blowing out from over voltage.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

Ah, ok. So that’s also why the 12-volt ones for my RV are reasonably priced. I learn something new every day.

poppajoe49
Member

Exactly RHG.

FormerlyDeanH
Guest

The heat is electric energy that is wasted in the CFL or incandescent. LED is superior tech in the illumination field. They used to be very rare and expensive but manufacturing techniques have improved and will continue to be improved, provided the economy doesn’t tank completely which would lead to simple oil lamps becoming the main source of household (cardboard shack) lighting.

I think uncle Fester would prefer the curly cue look of the CFL rather than the LED. Federal regulation probably restricts the use of mercury filled CFLs for oral humor though. Hopefully the Addams clan has a sufficient stockpile of the old incans.

JPTravis
Member

> …making the ROI still very advantageous

What are you smoking? By the time you get a bulb that has equivalent light to a 100-watt incandescent and can survive a dimmer switch you have $30.00 invested doing the same job a thirty-five-cent bulb was doing before. So your LED needs to last 85 times longer, and at those time lapses you need to start factoring in opportunity costs, and calculating whether you’ll still be in the same damn house and alive! I’ve got a 100-watt incandescent burning over my head right now that I put in there a year ago when I moved into this place. You got an LED that will last 85 years?

ROI my pale white ass.

poppajoe49
Member

You need to remember that the 100 watt incan you are using burns about 33 times the amount of electricity as the LEDs.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

I did mention that I prefer the light that is produced by LEDs also. So if I choose to buy some and scatter them around my RV, never having to change them again as long as I live, that’s my decision. I know there will never be any of those curley-Q things in here.

Screwy Puppy
Member

I too am moving to LEDs, but probably would have for the ‘geek’ factor.

CFLs look swishy and fragile. I do not want to twist anything fragile that contains mercury into a socket. Plus, there have been many stories of them bursting into flames.

Is this a plan to get rid of the economically disadvantaged? Poison them with mercury or burn down the slums?

perlcat
Member

I like mercury. I have a lot of happy memories playing with blobs of it as a kid. In fact, over 60% of the 300+ IT people where I work also remember playing with it as kids — so its effect on the human brain isn’t as dramatic as fear-mongered.

FormerlyDeanH
Guest

I played with it, too. In the late 60s I had a little bottle of it purchased at one of the several chemical supply shops that actually existed in the Milwaukee area. Many scientific supply companies were all over the place. Anyway, I put a quarter, 2 dimes and a nickel in a little dish full of it. Left it to soak for a week or so. Every typical cigarette, soda and candy vending machines of that time would register the coins then deliver them with the item purchased, or stolen depending on the aspect you take. The coating lasted several days, especially if you carried them in a clean container. I sold several sets of these treated coins for a small profit. Cigs in machines were typically 35 to 45 cents. I could buy 12 or more packs before the machine would keep one of the coins. Then I read a big article in Look or Life magazine about the horrific risk of exposing oneself to the stuff. I stopped. I knew it was poison but at that time what I thought about poison were to not put it in your mouth, not so much that having a little on the skin could be so bad.

RockingHorseGuy
Member

I had a little bottle that I played with. We used to salvage it from old light switches.